Meet our young artist - Interview with Gabor Andre


Gabor Andre is a young, emerging artist from Budapest. ARTODU Online Gallery of Contemporary Art represents his artworks. We asked him about his interests and his next steps in his career.

Artodu: What are your plans now, having received your diploma degree from MOME? What areas are you interested in trying first?

​Gabor Andre: After graduation I decided to try something completely new, right now I live an artistically bipolar life: apart from my studio time I started to work for a web-design company as a designer. That means a constant shifting from analog to digital techniques and back. That also means that my time is divided, still that kind of helps me to focus on painting and getting on with the main ideas of the current body of work.

Artodu: You were studying in Plymouth for a year. What is the difference between the education there and in Budapest?

Gabor Andre: Studying in the UK was really, really different than in Hungary, but the comparison cannot be absolutely fair in this case: I studied Product Design at MOME (the one in Budapest) and took the Painting, Drawing and Printmaking course at PCA (Plymouth College of Art). My opinion on the College was immediately that it is very well organised, the building had been recently renovated and it really was – as it seemed to me – super modern and well equipped. It had all the physical equipment from cameras to drawing tablets to borrow, and it all was supported by a really neat internal website. Through that website, I had access to all the goodies PCA had to offer, the equipment, tutorial classes, and consulting sessions with my teachers. And that is something that I want to highlight, it is really clear how internalised the spirit of democracy is at PCA throughout the whole structure of the institute. You had to take the effort to ask for the time of the teacher and the reaction you got was proportional to how much work you had put into your project, no one was left behind but those who wanted more actually got more. It didn't feel like time was money, it felt like time was a value, and it was really clear no one should waste any of the time of anyone else. I really liked that and I think the Hungarian institutes really need to improve in this area. College-wise I had the most satisfying time in Plymouth: I had all the opportunities to try, experiment all I wanted, I had all the equipment at hand that I needed and all the assistance ne